Masha. Minsk. 22 years old

clarabows:

Happy 109th birthday Clara Bow! 29th July 1905.

I loved her. She was so generous, no snootiness or anything. She was wonderful to me.”
- Jean Arthur

"I felt Clara was just marvelous, and I loved her. I feel very sorry for her, terribly sorry for her personally. She had such a sad life."
- Colleen Moore

"I was introduced to Clara Bow. I think we just said ‘hello.’ She was a bit nervous and was seemingly in haste. She was there to act and perform and she wanted to get started. I remember she was very nice and not an ‘It’ Girl at all. She was very quiet and not talkative. She wore a pleated skirt with a big belt around her waist and was very graceful. I could tell how talented she was because she could use her face so well. Whenever she spoke, her eyebrows would go up. She was very small with lovely hair over her forehead and great big eyes. She seemed insecure about the talkies and found the whole thing overwhelming. I remember hearing her say, ‘It’s all so new to me.’ She was all alone there. She’d go into make-up alone and do it herself and she’d come on the set alone. She didn’t depend on anybody. I didn’t think the studio was supporting her. She was such a big star and I think she could have had a longer career if they had been more helpful. I was impressed with what a nice girl she really was."
- Marian Marsh

"On Screen she was bigger than anybody. But off the screen she disappeared like an over-exposed negative."
- Louise Brooks

“Clara Bow is the quintessence of what the term ‘flapper’ signifies as a definite description: pretty, impudent, superbly assured, as worldly-wise, briefly-clad and ‘hard-berled’ as possible. There were hundreds of them, her prototypes. Now, completing the circle, there are thousands more, patterning themselves after her. It is rather futile to analyse flappers. They are just girls, all sorts of girls, their one common trait being that they are young things with a splendid talent for living.”
- F. Scott Fitzgerald

"When she is on the screen nothing else matters. When she is off, the same is true".
- Photoplay

"Then we were doing the death scene—Josef von Sternberg was directing that. She was dying, and I was kneeling beside her, weeping. She was chewing gum. She had this great wad of gum in her face when they said, ‘All right, Clara, get the gum out. We’re going to shoot the scene.’ She took the gum out, put it back of her ear, and died. Well, that struck me as so funny, I howled, and they had to wait for me to stop laughing before I could cry again."
- Esther Ralston

"If ever a star was made by public demand, it was Clara Bow."
- Adela Rogers St. Johns

"When Bow was at her height in pictures we could make a story with her in it and gross a million and a half, where another actress would gross half a million in the same picture and with the same cast."
- David Selznick

"This girl was the real thing, someone to stir every pulse in the nation."
- F. Scott Fitzgerald.

"There was no rivalry whatever between us. She had her part and I had mine. But I feel very sorry because one night, I think it was the night we finished the picture, I was giving a big party at my house and I had to rush home. Her dressing room was right next door to mine, and she must have known that I was giving a big party. All the Hollywood people, directors and everybody, were coming. She was standing in her doorway, and she said, ‘You’re having a party, aren’t you, Esther?’ I said, ‘Yes. Oh, would you like to come, Clara?’ ‘No, no’ she said, ‘I know you don’t want me.’ I’ve never forgotten that."
- Esther Ralston

"… Clara Bow lingers in the eye, long after the picture has gone."
Variety, 1924

ladyhistory:

The Still Continuing Captioned Adventures of George Washington

PART I | PART II | PART III | PART IV | PART V | PART VI | PART VII | PART VIII | PART IX | PART X | PART XI | PART XII | PART XIII

I think some people are so sealed inside their fate that they hide deep within their mind.


Marlon Brando photographed by Richard Avedon in New York, 1951.

Marlon Brando photographed by Richard Avedon in New York, 1951.

What makes cinema so attractive, so fascinating is that it’s not just a one plus one process. It’s a chemistry between sounds, words, ideas and image. - Wong Kar-wai

l was only curious to know how it started.

Now l know.

“I would like Martin Scorsese to be interested in a female character once in a while, but I don’t know if I’ll live that long.”
Meryl Streep (via fellini)

Hubble and Katie – The way we were

You're pretty mouthy for an analyst.